Seven Greek Destinations and Sites for People Who Love Greek Mythology

“Live your myth in Greece” – the phrase used to be Greece’s motto in some older international tourism campaigns. And that was for a good reason. Imagine stepping at the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis or cliff jumping at the home of the Cabeirian Mysteries. A trip to Greece is not just a seaside vacation but also a time-travelling experience.

If you have subscribed to Helinika’s YouTube channel, there is a great chance you love ancient Greek mythology and history, while also enjoying travelling. Here are seven Greek destinations and sites for people who would love to visit the most mythical places in Greece. Before we get started, make sure to like this video if you love travelling and mythology!

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7 Greek Destinations and Greek Sites for People Who Love Mythology

  1. Mt. Olympus
  2. Athens
  3. Delphi
  4. Eleusina
  5. Delos
  6. Samothrace
  7. Olympia

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Olympia, Peloponnese

One of the most important Panhellenic religious sanctuaries was situated in a small town in Ilia (Elis), in the Peloponnese. The town was named after the Olympian gods and goddesses, and it is still known as “Olympia”. Not only that but this is where the ancient Olympic Games were held every four years. A modern town with the same name is situated near “Archaea Olympia”, which is the ancient town and archaeological site. In ancient Olympia you will find ancient temples and training grounds that are maintained in a very good condition. Great examples are the “Palaestra”, the training grounds of wrestlers, and the ruins of the Temple of Hera. A trip to Olympia can be compared to a… time-travelling experience.

Samothrace Island, Northern Aegean Sea

Samothrace has been mentioned in many of Helinika’s articles and videos. That is because it is not just one of Greece’s hidden beauties, but also one of the country’s most mysterious sites. The Greek island is located in the northern Aegean Sea and it attracts people who love nature and mythology. Samothrace (also seen as Samothraki) was a major religious site in ancient Greece. It was the place where the ancient Cabeirian Mysteries were held, while it is still the home of the Sanctuary of the Great Gods; a temple complex to a group of enigmatic Greek gods. By visiting Samothrace you can spend your summer vacation by the sea, in close proximity to one of the world’s most mysterious places.

Delos Island, Cyclades

Delos is another mysterious Greek island. Situated at the heart of the Cyclades, Delos is one of the most important mythological, historical, and archaeological sites in Greece. It was also reportedly the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis. Today it is a UNESCO World Heritage site which can only be visited during the day. Overnight stays are not allowed but you can book a day trip from the nearby island of Mykonos.

Eleusina, West Attica

Eleusina (also seen as Eleusis) is a small town in West Attica, in close proximity to the city of Athens. The town is mostly known for its archaeological site – one of the most visited and well-maintained sites in Greece. The town is associated with goddess Demetra and her daughter, Persephone, and it was the place where the enigmatic Eleusinian Mysteries were held. Eleusina is a place every mythology lover should visit at least once in their lifetime.  

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Delphi, Phocis

Most Greek myths and epic poems involve a prophecy and an orator. One of the most trusted ancient Greek oracles was the oracle of Delphi in Phocis, central Greece. You may have heard the name Pytho, who had the role of Pythia. Pythia was the high priestess of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, who would give oracles for the future with the rustling of the leaves. Today, the area is an archaeological site and a UNESCO World Heritage site. A new town with the same name is in close proximity to the archaeological site. Visiting Delphi is truly a magical experience.

Athens, Attica

Athens is the capital of the Hellenic Republic of Greece and a popular destination for people who love history and mythology. Democracy was born in Athens. In Classical Antiquity, it was the most important cultural, artistic, and philosophical center in the West. The city is named after goddess Athena who, according to an old myth, offered the Athenians the olive tree. The production and export of olive oil reportedly contributed to the city’s financial success. The Greek capital has plenty of archaeological sites and museums, such as the Acropolis and the ancient Agora. Visiting Athens should definitely be on your list.

Mt. Olympus, Pieria

Ancient Greeks believed that Mount Olympus was the home of the twelve gods and goddesses who influenced every aspect of their lives. Zeus, Hera, Aphrodite, and the rest of the Olympians. Olympus is a real mountain located in Pieria in Northern Greece. It is the highest mountain in Greece and a World Biosphere Reserve. Gods and goddesses were thought to reside at 2.917 meters at its highest peak, Mytikas. Many hikers and climbers ascend to Mytikas to see Greece from Zeus’ perspective. If you are not an avid hiker, there are many traditional villages all around Olympus that you can drive to. There are also countless ancient and medieval sites, such as the archaeological park of Dion and the ancient city of Pydna. It goes without saying that Mount Olympus is the number one destination for people who love history, mythology, and nature.

Now, I am curious to hear if you have ever visited any of these places. If you liked this video, you can hit the like button and subscribe to stay connected.

One Day in Athens? Here is What to Do | 24h in Athens, Greece

athens travel guide

Athens is the capital of the Hellenic Republic of Greece; a city that has been inhabited for over 5.000 years and which is known around the world as the birthplace of Democracy, Theatre, and Philosophy.

The city was named after goddess Athena, the Olympian deity of wisdom and strategy. Today, more than five million people visit the  city of Athens to explore its archaeological sites and contemporary urban neighborhoods, and then hop onto the next ferry to one of Greece’s countless breathtaking islands.

Unfortunately, many visitors don’t get the chance to spend many days in the Greek capital, before traveling to their next destination. If you are in the same situation, the last thing you want to do is spend the entire day in your hotel room. Here is what to do if you stay in Athens for just one day!

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7 Things to Do in 24h in Athens, Greece (Athens Must-See)

  1. Ascend the Acropolis of Athens.
  2. Visit one of the city’s countless museums (e.g. Benaki Museum, Acropolis Museum).
  3. Cycle next to the canal at SNFCC.
  4. Explore the Anafiotika traditional neighborhood (Athens’ Old Town).
  5. Try authentic Athenian street-food (souvlaki me pita and more).
  6. Have a cocktail at one of the countless Athenian rooftop bars.

What to Wear in Greece in the Summer | What to Pack for Greece

You have booked your tickets to visit Greece this summer and now it is time to pack your bags. But your country of residence might have a completely different climate than the one in Greece. Should you pack your winter jacket “just in case”? Do you need to wear tights under your dresses? Should you leave your leather boots at home?

How to Fully Plan Your Day in Athens, Greece

Early Morning: Ascend the Acropolis of Athens

Almost every European city has a citadel – a fortified center that serves as a refuge but also as a repository or even as a religious center. For the ancient city of Athens, that was the Acropolis – the city’s highest point. The Acropolis of Athens is known for the impressive ancient temples dedicated to the Olympian gods and goddesses.  

The most impressive of them all is the Parthenon – the Doric temple dedicated to Athena, patroness of Athens. The temple was completed in 432 BC, and it was designed by the well-known architects Iktinos and Callicrates. Monuments other than the Parthenon are the Erechtheon, the Propulaea, and the temple dedicated to Athena Nike, the Eleusinion, and many more sanctuaries and temples. From the top, you can also view the ancient theatre of Herodes Atticus, which is still in use.

Nowadays, at least a million people visit the Acropolis of Athens every year. Situated at the heart of Athens, you can ascend the hill by entering from one of its two entrances: one close to the Areopagus Hill and one next to the Church of Hagia Paraskevi, close to the Acropolis metro station. The ticket shop is located next to the first entrance.

It is advised to visit the Acropolis Hill early in the morning. You will avoid waiting in long ques and walking around the citadel under the hot Athenian sun. You can always prebook your tickets and download them at your smartphone.

Before Noon: Explore Anafiotika

After exiting the archaeological sight of Acropolis, you can start exploring Anafiotika, the most picturesque neighborhood of Athens. Anafiotika is located in Plaka, the “old town” surrounding the Acropolis hill. And it can be described as an “island that overlooks the city of Athens”. No cars, streets, or tall buildings in sight. Just cats and the smell of Jasmine trees.

The neighborhood was founded by islanders from Anafi who moved to Athens to construct the Palace of Otto of Greece, the king of Greece from 1832 to 1862. Indeed, Anafiotika has an atmosphere similar to the ones in the Greek islands. A small escape within the city.

While strolling around, you can always stop and have a Greek coffee or an ouzo with meze (Greek version of tapas) in one of the local cafes and tavernas. Anafiotika and Plaka will amaze you.

Lunchtime: Athens Street Food Tour

After walking around for so long, you will probably get super hungry. But don’t worry, Athens is known for its great variety of street food options. The most popular option is of course the “gyros” or “souvlaki me pita”, as it is known in Athens. You can choose between a wide variety of ingredients -pieces of grilled chicken/pork, tomatoes, onions, fries, and tzatziki being the most popular options- to be wrapped within a delicious pita bread.

Athens has countless “souvlatzidika”, places where you can order and eat this delicious type of sandwich. They are in every neighborhood, and almost on every street at the city center. If you are looking for something sweet, you can always try the Eastern Mediterranean version of a donut: loukoumades. Round deep-fried pastries soaked in honey and coated with cinnamon. Loukoumades were reportedly consumed by ancient Greeks, who called them “honey tokens”.

Today, Athens hosts several street food restaurants that serve delicacies from all around the world: from crab burgers to bao buns. For a more authentic experience, you can always visit a local bakery and try a piece (or two) of Greece’s traditional savory or sweet pies, the so-called “pitas”: spanakopita (spinach pie), tyropita (cheese pie), and kolokythopita (zucchini pie). And, finally, it wouldn’t be a Mediterranean trip without a scoop of gelato to wash things down!

Top 10 Coolest Neighborhoods in Athens (to Explore or Live in)

When non-Athenians visit Athens, they usually explore the three historical neighborhoods surrounding the Acropolis hill. But Athens is more than Plaka, Monastiraki, and Thiseio. Here are some of the lesser-known Athenian neighborhoods you should explore or consider living in.

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Early Afternoon: Visit an Indoor Museum

Athens can get quite hot at noon and early afternoon. After your Athens street food tour, it is time to explore at least one indoor Athenian Museum. You will get a taste of the Greek culture, while enjoying the cool air from the air conditioning units.

Athens has numerous Museums and Galleries, including the Acropolis Museum, the Goulandris Museum of Cycladic Art, the National Archaeological Museum of Athens, Benaki Museum, Ilias Lalaounis Jewelry Museum, Museum of Greek Folk Art, the National Art Gallery, and more.

Keep in mind that the National Archaeological Museum is the biggest Athenian Museum. Moreover, many of these Museums and Galleries are located in the suburbs. Since you will be staying in Athens for only one day, visiting a small or medium-sized Museum near the center, such as the Acropolis Museum, is the best option.

Late Afternoon: Visit the SNFCC

Founded by the philanthropic organization, Stavros Niarchos Foundation, the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Cultural Center (SNFCC) or simply “Niarchos”, as locals call it, is a public space, where everyone has free access and can participate in various activities and events.

The Cultural Center includes the Greek National Opera, the National Library of Greece, and the Stavros Niarchos Park. Countless free events, such as open-air movie nights, concerts, and athletic activities, regularly take place at SNFCC.

Niarchos is one of the few places in Athens where you can safely cycle. You can rent public bicycles and cycle around the canal. You can walk up the “Lighthouse” and get a panoramic view of the city. You can also explore its magnificent gardens, such as the Mediterranean Garden.

Evening: Cocktail Time

After a long day walking around the city, it is time to return to the city center (Syntagma or Monastiraki) for some drinks. Athens is known for its rooftop bars, such as “Couleur Locale” and “Anglais Athens”, where you can enjoy some drinks and order some finger-food, if you feel like it.

Depending on how much time you have in hand, you can have a bar tour of Athens. The Greek capital has also plenty of cocktail bars that are situated on the ground floor. During the summer, it is common to get a drink at the bar and chat with your friends on the street.

Last but not least, Athens has some of the best bars not only in Europe but… in the world. From cocktail to wine bars to… underground speak-easy bars. “The Clumsies” has been repeatedly been placed on the top 3 best bars in the world, according to the “50 BEST” annual rankings! Getting a drink before you leave is a must.

Are you planning on extending your stay? Here is a list with the coolest Athenian neighborhoods to explore!

The Most Underrated Greek Destinations | 7 Unique Places to Visit in Greece

underrated greek destinations

There are plenty of hidden gems to discover in Greece. We have previously seen Greek destinations that foreign visitors might ignore, but locals visit frequently. These include Halkidiki and Mount Pelion. But there are some incredible places in the country that even Greeks often snub, unless they live in close proximity to them.

Some of these places are the birthplaces of important Modern Greek figures. They have landscapes and architectural styles that you may not associate with Greece. Let’s explore together some of the most underrated Greek destinations.

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Seven Underrated Greek Destinations

  1. Missolonghi
  2. Syros Island
  3. Salamis Island
  4. Arcadia Region
  5. Kithira & Antikithira
  6. Kavala
  7. Xanthi

Xanthi | Unique Places in Greece

Xanthi is a unique city in the region of Thrace in northeastern Greece. Since it is not located right by the sea and due to it’s a bit colder climate, many Greeks and foreign visitors rarely travel to Xanthi. The exception is, of course, the well-known annual carnival festival.

But Xanthi, especially its old town, has a very unique and beautiful architecture that it is hard to find in Greece. Its local bazaar attracts many visitors every Saturday. And let’s not forget that the city was the birthplace of one of the greatest Greek and European composers: Manos Hatzidakis. His beautiful home is now a Museum that everyone should visit when in Xanthi.  

Kavala | Underrated Destinations in Greece

Kavala is another city in northern Greece. This time, situated by the sea in eastern Macedonia. Due to the fact that it is located far from Athens, it is not such a popular destination as other places in Greece.

But the city is not only beautiful, but it also has many monuments that showcase Greece’s long history. It was founded in the 7th century BC and it was an important fort city of the Byzantine Empire. As a result, it has countless monuments that are worth a visit. Not only that but Xanthi is also connected to the Roman Via Egnatia hiking trail.

Kithira and Antikithira | Lessen-Known Greek Destinations

Another beautiful Greek location that is not easy to reach from Greece’s big cities, is Kithira (or Kythera). Kithira is an island located in the south-eastern tip of the Peloponnese peninsula. It is associated with another, much smaller island named Antikithira (or Antikythera).

The islands have a long history, beautiful landscapes and beaches, and a unique architecture with a Venetian influence. When it comes to Antikithira, you may have heard of the famous Antikythera Mechanism; the oldest example of an analogue computer that was used to predict astronomical positions, among other things. The mechanism was discovered at a shipwreck off the coast of the remote island of Antikithira.

Arcadia Region | Underrated Places in Greece

Arcadia is a region in the Peloponnese. The region has a long history and it has been featured in many mythological stories – including the story of Arcas and the god Pan. Since it is not connected to the sea, it is not a popular destination for people who visit Greece.

But Arcadia is an area you should definitely visit once in your life. To begin with, the area has been traditionally inhabited by one of the oldest Greek tribes: the Arcadians. The Mountains of Arcadia are full of picturesque, authentic villages. Tripoli, the city of Arcadia, is known for its brave people. They played a crucial role in the Greek War of Independence.

Salamis Island | Unique Greek Destinations

You may know the island of Salamis thanks to the naval battle of Salamis against the Persian Empire in 480 BC. It is in close proximity to Athens and it belongs to the administrative region of Attica. Although many Athenians visit Salamis for a short visit, it is rarely the first choice for their summer vacation.

But the island has a long history and it is featured in countless mythological stories. Not only that, but it was the birthplace of the ancient tragedian Euripides. The island has beautiful monasteries – including the historic monastery of Faneromeni-, various beaches, and forests.

Syros Island | Underrated Greek Destinations

Syros is a Cycladic island, just like Santorini and Paros. But fewer people know about it and even Greeks rarely consider it for their summer vacations. Perhaps that is because it was an important industrialized port island with an atmosphere that distinguishes it from the laid-back neighboring islands.

Syros is an impressive island with numerous neo-classical mansions – especially in its main town, Ermoupolis. The mayor’s house of Syros is one of the most impressive municipal buildings in the entire country. Ano Syros, a second town, was built by the Venetians. It still maintains a medieval atmosphere.

The island is the birthplace of many important Greek figures from antiquity till modern times, including the illustrious writer Emmanuel Rhoides and the legendary musician Markos Vamvakaris. If you love history and architecture, Syros island is an island you should add to your list.

Missolonghi | Unique Destinations in Greece

The most underrated place to visit in Greece might be Missolonghi – which today is mostly known for its salt. It is rarely on the list of Greeks and foreign visitors, unless they have any ties to it. Missolonghi did not only play a crucial role in the Greek War of Independence, inspiring the philhellene Lord Byron to participate in the revolution, but it is also one of the most unique Greek destinations.

The town, situated in Aetolia-Acarnania in West Greece, has a picturesque architecture but also a functional and modern urban planning that is hard to find in most Greek cities and towns. Moreover, it is one of the few places in Greece where you can safely ride your bike. It has many landmarks (including the Garden of Heroes), museums, and cultural centers. The first prime minister of Greece, Spyridon Trikoupis, was born in Missolonghi. The same applies to countless other important Greek figures.

A picturesque place that you should visit is Tourlida, an island in Missolonghi Lagoon, known for its picturesque fisherman houses on piles. Tourlida is connected to the shore by road and you could easily cycle there from the town of Missolonghi!

All of the above places are also known for their delicious local cuisine. The makaronopita (pasta pie) of Missolonghi, the loukoumi and frisoura of Syros, the chylopites of Arcadia, the anthogalera of Kithira…

If you enjoyed this video, feel free to like and subscribe. Do you have any other underrated Greek destinations to add to the list? You can leave a comment in the comment section!

10 Winter Destinations in Greece | Greece Beyond Summer

Greece is without a doubt the ultimate summer destination. With its mild climate and one of the longest coastlines in the world, millions of people visit the Hellenic Republic of Greece every year. But Greece is more than sunny beaches and clear blue waters. Here are Greece’s top winter destinations.

10 Top Greek Destinations for the Winter

  1. Mount Olympus
  2. Arachova
  3. Northern Pelion
  4. Meteora
  5. Zagori
  6. Trikala of Corinthia
  7. Xanthi
  8. Mounts of Attica
  9. Athens
  10. Thessaloniki

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#10 Thessaloniki

Thessaloniki is the second biggest city in Greece and one of the most beautiful ones as well. Situated in the Greek region of Macedonia in northern Greece, the port city of Thessaloniki has been a cosmopolitan city for many centuries. Known for its unique architecture, relaxed lifestyle, and rich history, Thessaloniki attracts many visitors every year. The city is also one of the places that see some snow from time to time during the winter, with many Greeks visiting it for this exact reason!

Another reason to visit Thessaloniki is the fact that is considered the food capital of Greece. Do you like sweet treats? Try the traditional sweet-savory bougatsa pie with lots of cinnamon and you will instantly fall in love with the city. Do you prefer fine dining? You will find plenty of restaurants to choose from. Since the Greek summer can be quite hot, hence reducing people’s appetite, make sure to visit Thessaloniki in the winter.

# 9 Athens

The capital of Greece might be visited all year round, however, it is recommended to visit it during the winter. Just ask a tourist who did outdoor sightseeing in Athens in July. Athenian summers are always very hot, with the temperature reaching often 40 degrees Celsius during the day. Therefore, coming during the winter is more enjoyable.

The city of Athens is always sunny, and the temperature can reach 20 degrees Celsius even in December. Pack your lightest coat and a few thin sweaters (or your shorts if you are from Scandinavia) and climb up the Acropolis of Athens and the Filopappou hill. Walk around the ancient Agora and National Gardens and explore the ancient cemetery of Kerameikos. Visit the Acropolis Museum, the National Archaeological Museum, the Benaki Museum, and Stavros Niarchos Cultural Center. Go thrift shopping in the second-hand markets of Monastiraki and Omonoia and order a nice cocktail in the bars around Square Klafthmonos.In the winter, there are also several theatrical plays. If you understand Greek at a basic level, watching a play in the birthplace of drama is a lifetime experience.

#8 Mounts of Attica

Athens is situated in Attica, a region with rich history. Attica is visited throughout the year by nature and hiking lovers because of its mountainous landscape. Try exploring Mount Hymettus, Penteli, and Parnitha. These mountains were considered “magical” since ancient times and there are often visited by paranormal investigators. A great example would be the “haunted” cave of Mount Penteli. If you love skiing, you can also visit Mount Parnassos ski center!

#7 Xanthi

Due to its geographic location, Xanthi is one of the most culturally diverse cities in Greece. Situated in the northern region of Thrace, Xanthi welcomes many visitors during the winter. The city is known for its unique architecture. Byzantine churches, next to Ottoman-era mosques, and neoclassical buildings from the 19th century. Every winter, the city celebrates one of Greece’s most popular events: the carnival of Xanthi. It is recommended to visit the folklore museum, the old town, and the nearby waterfalls.

#6 Trikala of Corinthia

In the North Peloponnese, Greece holds one of its greatest secrets: Trikala. The picturesque town is known for its beautiful landscape, traditional homes made out of stone, and numerous winter traditions. Many families visit Trikala during Christmas to see the “Mill of the Elves” – the most beautiful Christmas themed park in Greece (which is completely free of charge). Not only that, but Trikala is one of the few smart cities in the world! It has automated citizens service center, mobile check apps, wifi for everyone, smart lighting system, smart parking system, smart waste management, and many more advanced municipal services. Trikala was also the first city to use driverless buses!

#5 Zagori

Zagori is a region in the Pindus mountains in the Epirus region of Greece. The area is known for its magnificent landscapes that are very rare in southern Europe. Rare animal species such as the brown bear and the wolf reside there. Greeks visit the area during the winter months to hike or explore the 46 traditional picturesque villages, known as the “Zagorochoria” (the villages of Zagori). Zagori has two national parks, traditional arched stone bridges, crystal-clear waters, and numerous Byzantine churches. It is without a doubt one of the most beautiful places in Greece.

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#4 Meteora

If you love climbing, you might already know Meteora. It is a rock formation in central Greece, near the town of Kalabaka. The area is included on the UNESCO World Heritage List and is visited by people from around the world who are intrigued by its unique landscape. On top of some of the hills, there are Christian Orthodox monasteries that were built there during Byzantine times. Many climbers attempt to climb on top of the hills and countless film companies have asked for permission to film there. Meteora is one of the magnificent places to visit in Greece during the winter.

#3 Northern Pelion

Although South Pelion is a secret summer paradise, Northern Pelion – a mountain range in central Greece, is Greece’s winter hidden gem. Do you love skiing and winter sports? You can visit the ski resort of Chania. Do you love hiking? You can explore the cobblestone trails connecting Pelion’s traditional villages. Pelion is one of the few places where you can experience heavy snowfall in Greece.

#2 Arachova

The most well-known ski resort in Greece is the one of Arachova. It is situated next to one of the most picturesque villages of the entire country, Arachova. Located in the region of Boeotia, not very far from Attica, it gathers many visitors from Athens. The village is known for its woodcut creations, dark red wine, traditional carpets, and chylopites – a type of pasta that dates back to Byzantine times.

#1 Olympus

It was believed to be the home of the gods and goddesses of ancient Greece. The kingdom of Zeus and Hera. A magnificent mountain that reaches the heavens. How could it come second or third on this list? Mount Olympus is one of the most popular hiking and climbing destinations in Greece. It is also a ski mountaineering destination for avid skiers! On Mount Olympus you can find several beautiful villages, including some ghost villages such as Morna. The village was abandoned for unknown reasons and many urban legends have spurred over the years. The village was built on the “dark” side of Olympus, where sunlight is limited. Since ancient times, Greeks avoided this part of the mountain, since it was visited by chthonic deities, and not by the gods and goddesses who resided at the top.

Four Things to Avoid in Greece | Greece Travel Advice

Some time ago I posted a video with do’s and dont’s in Athens, Greece. But I realized that there are other things that I did not mention and that do not apply only in Athens. So today I will discuss some things to avoid when traveling or moving to Greece. Before we get started, make sure to subscribe and stay till the end because the last two things I will mention are literally lifesaving.

Things to Avoid in Greece:

  1. Splitting the Bill
  2. Not Tipping
  3. Dress Appropriately When Sightseeing
  4. Showering When the Water Heater is On

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When Eating and Drinking in Greece, Avoid Splitting the Bill

You are eating out with friends in a restaurant in Greece and it is time to pay the bill. Although a lot of bars and restaurants nowadays offer the option of having each person pay individually, splitting the bill is considered bad etiquette and it is generally frowned upon. In Greece, restaurants are responsible for creating a bill for every single table and not for every single person who is eating there. Then, it is the responsibility of the people who sit on the table to find a way to pay for everything.

That is not only because it is way faster for the waiters and waitresses who need to attend other tables, but also because, in Greece, it is common to order food as a group and not as an individual. For example, Greeks usually order a bunch of different dishes that they agree upon and each person gets an empty plate to fill it up with anything they like. Just like a family would do at home.

It is important to remember that Greece is considered much less individualistic and much more collectivistic than countries such the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom, without that meaning that people have less individual rights or anything like this. It is more about how well people integrate into groups and how easy it is to take decisions as a collective.

Tipping Might Be Optional in Greece But It Is Also Expected

Tipping in Greece is not mandatory, as it is in the US, and you definitely don’t have to do any calculations to make sure that you tipped an acceptable amount. However, unless the service was terrible, you are expected to leave a tip on the table that you deem appropriate for the service. That applies mostly in cafes, bars, and restaurants, rather than hair salons or other businesses that offer some type of service. Tipping taxi drivers or employees in self-service restaurants is less common. However, when ordering food, tipping the delivery man or woman is recommended.

There is no specified percentage of the bill that should be offered as a tip. Most people would agree that one euro for two cups of coffee and five euros for a 25-euro bill at a restaurant are acceptable. When the amount you have to pay is too small, it is preferred to round things down: giving 2 euros when the bill says 1,65. However, leaving 1-2  cents as a tip is worse than not leaving a tip at all.

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Dress Appropriately When Sightseeing

Most museums and archaeological sites around the world have dress codes or at least a few rules regarding what is not allowed to wear. The same applies in Greece. As in most European countries, the dress code in Greek museums is very relaxed – you don’t have to dress up formally or cover your entire body, but you might be asked to cover up if you enter without a shirt or with a crop top.

What most visitors do not know is that there are stricter rules when visiting archaeological sites. For example, the Herodion Theater of Athens does not allow the entrance to anyone wearing hilled shoes, since they can ruin the marble auditorium. Furthermore, if you are visiting historical churches and monasteries, you might be asked to cover your legs, whether you are a man or a woman.

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Avoid Showering When the Water Heater (Boiler) is On

Houses and apartment buildings in Greece have two different water heaters: one powered with solar energy and an electric one. The second is used only on the rare occasion that there is no sunlight for over 24 hours. Also, some old houses do not have a solar powered water heater installed.

If you have to turn on an electric water heater when travelling in Greece, note that you shouldn’t let it run for hours. It is extremely costly and the chances of starting a fire due to an electrical short circuit are high. But the most important part is to always turn it off when someone is showering. Many water heaters are not properly insulated and showering with the water heater on can lead to electrocution.

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