Greek Homophones and How to Distinguish Them (χήρα, χείρα…) | Bilingual Vlog #5 [ENG/GR]

Homophones (from the Greek homo- ὁμο‑, “same”, and phōnḗ φωνή, “voice, utterance) are words that sound the same but have a completely different meaning and, sometimes, different spelling. Here is a list of Greek homophones that sometimes confuse Greek language students. The list includes words that have the accent tone placed on a different syllable but still sound similar to the ears of a non-native speaker. No. 18 shows two words that have the same spelling but completely different meanings.

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18 Greek Homophones (Ομόηχες λέξεις)

  1. Χήρα – Χείρα
  2. Χήρος – Χοίρος
  3. Ευφορία – Εφορία
  4. Κλείνω – Κλίνω
  5. Κλήμα – Κλίμα
  6. Παίρνω – Περνώ
  7. Παϊδάκια – Παιδάκια
  8. Πιάνο – Πιάνω
  9. Ή – Η
  10. Λιμός – Λοιμός
  11. Όμως – Ώμος
  12. Ίσως – Ίσος
  13. Βάζω – Βάζο
  14. Κάνω – Κανό
  15. Μηλιά – Μιλιά
  16. Ψηλός – Ψιλός
  17. Τύχη – Τείχη – Τοίχοι
  18. Όρος – Όρος

Watch the video and learn how to pronounce and distinguish these Greek homophones.

Greek Idioms and Phrases that Can’t Be Translated | Bilingual Vlog #4 [ENG/GR]

greek bilingual vlog

In today’s Greek-English vlog, you are going to learn a number of Greek phrases and idioms that make no sense when translated into other languages. For example, can you guess what “you ate my ears” means in Greek?

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Don’t Translate These English Idioms into Greek | Bilingual Vlog #3 [ENG/GR]

Every language has its own phrases and idioms that have a different or no meaning when translated into another language. That’s why translating novels and poems is no walk in the park. Here are a few English phrases and idioms that you should avoid translating into Greek (+ what you can say instead). The bilingual vlog also includes English idioms that do make sense when translated into Greek.

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