Modern Greek Verb “To Have” (Έχω) Conjugation in Present, Past, and Future

The modern Greek verb «έχω» means “to have”. «Έχω» is one of the most useful modern Greek verbs, since it is used in all the Perfect Greek tenses (Παρακείμενος, Υπερσυντέλικος, Μέλλοντας Συντελεσμένος). The Greek verb “to have” only has one Present, one Past, and one Future form. That means that it is not conjugated in every single modern Greek tense. Here is the conjugation of the Greek verb “to have” in all of its three forms.

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Greek Verb “To Have” in the Present: Έχω (I have)

εγώ έχω

εσύ έχεις

αυτός-ή-ό έχει

εμείς έχουμε

εσείς έχετε

αυτοί-ές-ά έχουν

Greek Verb “To Have” in the Past: Είχα (I had)

εγώ είχα

εσύ είχες

αυτός-ή-ό είχε

εμείς είχαμε

εσείς είχατε

αυτοί-ές-ά είχαν

Greek Verb “To Have” in the Future: Θα Έχω (I will have)

εγώ θα έχω

εσύ θα έχεις

αυτός-ή-ό θα έχει

εμείς θα έχουμε

εσείς θα έχετε

αυτοί-ές-ά θα έχουν

Greek Verb “To Be” Conjugation (Είμαι, Ήμουν, Θα Είμαι)

The most common modern Greek verb is the verb “είμαι” (to be). The Greek verb “to be” has only three forms: one for the present, one for the future, and one for the past. There are no specific forms for every single modern Greek tense for the verb “είμαι”.

One Reply to “Modern Greek Verb “To Have” (Έχω) Conjugation in Present, Past, and Future”

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